Dating ludwig snare

dating ludwig snare

How do I find the date on a Ludwig drum?

Many Ludwig drums, including main line (Keystone and Blue/Olive Badges) and Standards, have dates stamped inside their shells or on paper labels. In the 1999-2005 time frame, several guides were published which report known serial number and date stamp combinations and/or show the general relationship between serial number and date.*

How do I identify a Ludwig?

In this article, we’ll be looking at the three best ways to identify a Ludwig: date stamp, serial number/badge style and shell construction. Forenote:The first two means of indication, date stamp and serial number/badge style, are the two most accurate for identifying the correct year of production.

What are the different parts of the Ludwig dating guide?

It is broken down into five parts: Part I - Current Guides, Part II - New Dating Guides for 1963-1984, Part III - Tracking Changes in Physical Characteristics, Part IV - Dating Guide for Ludwig Standards 1968-1973, and Part V - Date Codes from 1971/72 Era. Released in December 2013.

How did we begin the process of indexing Ludwig drums?

We began in the late 1980’s by monitoring all of the 60’s Ludwig drums that came into our shop. Thanks to the production boom of the 60’s, we had a large sampling of drums which provided enough data to do our research. When we found a drum with both a serial number and complete date stamp present, this data was entered into a serial number index.

How many Ludwig Drums have serial numbers and date stamps?

As of December 10, 2013, a database of 1,442 reliable reports of serial numbers and date stamps from the main line of Ludwig drums has been compiled. Fifty-eight have date stamps but badges without serial numbers and 120 additional drums have serial numbers and Date Codes.

How can I tell how old a Ludwig drum is?

Date stamps are simultaneously the best and worst means to properly date a Ludwig drum from the 60s (use of the date stamp was discontinued ca. 1970 with the introduction of the “Blue & Olive” badge). A drum was stamped when the shell was finished, providing the most accurate depiction of the age of wood due to the fact final assembly came later.

How did we begin the process of indexing Ludwig drums?

We began in the late 1980s by monitoring all of the 60s Ludwig drums that came into our shop. Thanks to the production boom of the 60s, we had a large sampling of drums, which provided enough data to do our research. When we found a drum with both a serial number and complete date stamp present, this data was entered into a serial number index.

How do I identify a Ludwig?

In this article, we’ll be looking at the three best ways to identify a Ludwig: date stamp, serial number/badge style and shell construction. Forenote:The first two means of indication, date stamp and serial number/badge style, are the two most accurate for identifying the correct year of production.

What is the history of Ludwig drums?

Ludwig Drums is a US manufacturer of percussion instruments. The brand achieved significant popularity in the 1960s, through the endorsement of Beatles drummer Ringo Starr.

When did Ludwig start putting serial numbers on their drums?

In fact, it wasn’t until 1964 that Ludwig started to put serial numbers on their products. That leaves 4 years of 60’s era drums that can’t be dated using a serial number guide. The boom in production, along with new government regulations, prompted Ludwig to begin issuing serial numbers on badges of their drums.

How can I tell when my Ludwig Drum was made?

One day a box of drum badges could turn up or in many cases new serial number badges were put on top of older serial number badges making it difficult for us today to know exactly when the drum was made. Regardless, there are three different Ludwig Serial Number dating guides, drum badge dating guides and all sorts of Ludwig History.

Who were Ludwig&Ludwig?

In 1909, William F. and Theobald Ludwig, two sons of German immigrants, decided to start a drum company which they would name Ludwig & Ludwig. William was a professional drummer who usually played circus and vaudeville gigs, but he wasn’t getting as much work as he would have liked.

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